British Embassy

Authorised Translations in Amman

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If you’re looking for a professional company which deals with official translations and is recognised by the foreign embassies here in Jordan then I recommend SATO:

I got recommendations letters and certificates translated from English into Arabic. The charge was 5 JDs per paper and within few days it was complete. For same day translations, you have to pay double the amount.

Sukaina Authorised Translation Office

Mr Ibrahim J. Musa

Jabal Al-Hussein

Sukaina Commercial Complex

Ground Floor

Mobile: 00962 795699077

Tel: 00962 6 5699077

Fax: 00962 6 5606552

Email: sato@nets.com.jo

List of lawyers in Amman

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Here is a document link to a list of lawyers that the British Embassy use in Amman. I have had several dealings with the embassy in the recent past and as a result was able to extract information which might be useful for some readers.

wasapnin

Embassy decorators

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I know I have been going on about embassies in the past few days but what is it about embassies? I have talked about the staff they choose and how much interaction occurs between embassies. In my experience throughout the world with embassies but at this moment in time I am discussing the embassies in Jordan; they seem to employ people who are rude with least amount of people skills they could find. As one commentator on my blog advices that I need to work backwards in-order to get things done, so logic seems to be a thing of the past.

At first it didn’t occur to me until I visited the British Embassy recently. When I was sitting waiting for my turn to be questioned. I almost lost myself within my surroundings and for a moment I thought I was in the UK. The interior designer of the embassy must have imported furniture, deco and the design layout from the UK. The same seems to be for the Egyptian, Dutch, Syrian and Pakistani embassies that I have visited; they remind me of the home countries. As soon as you step into embassies, you can almost forget you are in Jordan. I do not wish to offend the certain nationalities by discussing the lack of care that has gone into designing, decorating the embassies but all I can say is that the interior decorators must have been specially brought in from the relevant countries to ensure that the their embassies resemble their motherland.

wasapnin

Egyptian work visa

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In order for me to enter Egypt on a work visa, I need to go through a rigorous procedure, which everyone seems to be keeping to themselves until the last moment.

Here is how I went about to get my work visa sorted from Jordan.

I have to certify my British Certificates which have already been certified by my current employer but this is not enough. The British Council does not certify them unless they have written conformation my institutes. The institutes where I rightly gained my certificates from tend not to reply to emails. After numerous emails, international calls and lots of faxes I received the confirmation that I needed. However, this was not good enough as the British Council would like the confirmations sent to them directly. This vital information was omitted from me on the numerous occasions I spoke to the staff at the British Council.

Having completed this procedure, I went to the Egyptian Embassy to get my papers stamped. After painful and long queues in all the queues where I was not suppose to queue, I found out that the Egyptian Embassy does not accept stamps of other Councils such as the British. I have to get the documents stamped from the British Embassy.

I went to the British Embassy who informed me that they will be happy to stamp the documents but at a price of 41 JDs although their own Council has stamped and authorised my documents. This for some reason does not mater and I have to pay the amount they have requested. I had to get 4 documents stamped; I was not carrying such a large sum of money. After I had stamped the documents from the British Embassy, I preceded back to the Egyptian Embassy. At the Egyptian Embassy I was informed that they cannot stamp my documents if the Foreign Ministry of Jordan has not stamped the documents. I then went to the Foreign Ministry of Jordan and got all my documents stamped. Finally I went to the Egyptian Embassy to stamp my documents, I was told that each stamp would cost me 16JDs and I would need to return the next day to pick up my documents.

All the above procedure took me over a month. To be honest this could have been shortened to a few days if only people firstly, did their jobs, secondly all embassy staff were trained on procedures so that they can provide all the information from the beginning and finally if all the Embassies actually bothered to talk to one another and just try to understand each other and work together for once.

Wishful thinking I suppose.

wasapnin

British Embassy

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(wasapninegypt)

Below is an article I wrote on my other Blog ‘wasapninjordan’ about local people having almost ‘Jackal and Hyde’ personalities when they work for the British Embassy. I wait to see how my experiences will be in Egypt. Only time will tell.

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What is it about the perfectly warm and hospitable people, as they are known throughout the land of Jordan, but when you interact with some of them in a small building called the British Council, Amman that they turn rude and arrogant? I have had numerous interactions with the staff members working for the British Council over the year or so and after every contact with them I have tried to give them the benefit of the doubt that maybe ‘they have had a bad day’ or ‘it’s not their fault.’ Every time I interact with them my perception about the staff working at the British Council becomes increasingly negative.

I have had staff members sitting behind the service desks without smiles and being plain rude, to the extent of telling me to be quiet for asking a question because the member of staff was not ready to answer. I have dealt with staff who could not be bothered to give me the correct information because god knows why? And by the way, the members of staff do not make mistakes – it never happens, so don’t even try to correct them. To be honest the list goes on and I am not the only one who feels the same way. Many of my colleagues agree with me.

It is a shame to see people behave in such an appalling manner. I wonder if it is because of the place they work in.

wasapninjordan

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wasapninegypt

British Council Staff – Amman

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British Council Magazine

(photo by wasapninjordan)

What is it about the perfectly warm and hospitable people, as they are known throughout the land of Jordan, but when you interact with some of them in a small building called the British Council, Amman that they turn rude and arrogant? I have had numerous interactions with the staff members working for the British Council over the year or so and after every contact with them I have tried to give them the benefit of the doubt that maybe ‘they have had a bad day’ or ‘it’s not their fault.’ Every time I interact with them my perception about the staff working at the British Council becomes increasingly negative.

I have had staff members sitting behind the service desks without smiles and being plain rude, to the extent of telling me to be quiet for asking a question because the member of staff was not ready to answer. I have dealt with staff who could not be bothered to give me the correct information because god knows why? And by the way, the members of staff do not make mistakes – it never happens, so don’t even try to correct them. To be honest the list goes on and I am not the only one who feels the same way. Many of my colleagues agree with me.

It is a shame to see people behave in such an appalling manner. I wonder if it is because of the place they work in.

wasapnin