The Beginning

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Well its taken us 18 months to get here and we are finally here. We got the courage and time to get on the web. What a better way to start then to share your experiences, and mistakes with others and hopefully others can learn from our mistakes and enrich their journey.

I arrived to Amman, Jordan on the 16th of August. My wife joined me two months later. Before I came to Jordan, I was advised by everyone not to go. They said ‘Are you crazy? why do you want to go to the middle of a war zone?’ ‘Don’t they still ride camels over there?’ ‘So you’re gona be living in a tent then? Isn’t it how they live?’

Anyhow I totally ignored their advise, as they obviously did not seem to be too versed in the reality of the Middle East. I booked a ticket and arrived to Amman, Queen Alia International Airport in the middle of the night and was picked up by my schools Administrative Officer and the Head of Secondary. It was then what it seemed to be a very long journey to my new home, where I would lay my head and call it home for the next two years.

They showed me around my new home and left. I was left alone in a new house, new city, new country and as I lay my head to sleep I wondered about what I had left behind and thought about all the possibilities that lay ahead of me.

The rest as we say ‘is history’. 🙂

Jordan Facts

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  • Full name: The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
  • Population: 5.7 million (UN, 2005)
  • Capital: Amman
  • Area: 89,342 sq km (34,492 sq miles)
  • Major language: Arabic
  • Major religion: Islam
  • Life expectancy: 70 years (men), 73 years (women) (UN)
  • Monetary unit: 1 Jordan dinar = 1,000 fils
  • Main exports: Phosphates, fertilisers, agricultural products
  • GNI per capita: US $2,500 (World Bank, 2006)
  • Internet domain: .jo
  • International dialling code: +962

 

 

This is an adventure

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Lord Islington argued that the provisions concerning the establishment of a Jewish national home were inconsistent with Article 22 of the Covenant of the League of Nations, which had laid the foundations of the mandatory system. Lord Islington continued that ‘the mandate imposes on Great Britain the reasonability of trusteeship for a Zionist political predominance where 90 per cent of the population are non-Zionist and non-Jewish … In fact, very many orthodox Jews, not only in Palestine but all over the world, view with the deepest misapprehension, not to say dislike, this principle of a Zionist Home in Palestine … The scheme of a Zionist Home sought to make Zionist political predominance effective in Palestine by importing into the country extraneous and alien Jews from other parts of the world … This scheme of importing an alien race into the midst of a native local race is flying in the very face of the whole of the tendencies of the age. It is an unnatural experiment … It is literally inviting subsequent catastrophe …

Answering this criticism, the author of the Declaration, Lord Balfour, said:

Zionism may fail…this is an adventure…Are we never to have adventures? Are we never to try new experiments?…I do not think I need dwell upon this imaginary wrong which the Jewish Home is going to inflict upon the local Arabs. (Lord Balfour 21st June 1922 – House of Lords)

Lord Sydenham replied that the Zionist experiment would fail, but the harm done by dumping down an alien population upon an Arab country – Arab all round in the hinterland – may never be remedied … What we have done is, by concessions, not to the Jewish people but to a Zionist extreme section, to start a running sore in the East, and no one can tell how far the sore will extend.

House of Lords, 21 June 1922